How Much Cyanide is in Apple Seeds?

How much cyanide is in apple seeds? That’s a question we get a lot here at Poison Control. While a few seeds won’t kill you, eating a large quantity of them could be very dangerous.

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What is cyanide?

Cyanide is a chemical compound that contains the element carbon and the element nitrogen. Cyanide is found in many foods and is used in industry and agriculture. It is also found in cigarette smoke and auto exhaust. Cyanide is used to make many products, including plastics, dyes, and pesticides.

Apples are among the fruits that contain cyanide. The cyanide found in apple seeds is not harmful to humans unless it is consumed in large quantities. Apple seeds contain a compound called amygdalin, which breaks down into hydrogen cyanide when digested. Although a single seed contains a small amount of cyanide, it would take eating a large number of seeds to cause harm.

Cyanide in nature

Apple seeds contain a small amount of cyanide. Cyanide is found in many foods and is also produced by our bodies. It is a natural component of many plants and is necessary for some metabolic processes. A very small amount of cyanide can kill a person, but it would take a large amount of apple seeds to do so..

Cyanide in fruit seeds

Cyanide is found in very small amounts in the seeds of fruits such as apples, apricots, almonds, and cherries. It’s also in the pits of peaches, plums, and prunes. Cyanide is used by plants to ward off pests such as insects and fungi.

The government has set a limit for the amount of cyanide that can be present in the seeds of commercially grown fruits. The average apple seed contains about 0.18% cyanide by weight. That’s about 3 times higher than the cyanide limit for apple seeds set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). But don’t worry—you would have to eat several hundred seeds to get a lethal dose of cyanide.

Cyanide and apple seeds

Cyanide is a highly poisonous chemical compound that can be found in many different plants, including apple seeds. While it is true that a single apple seed is not going to kill you, eating a large number of them could potentially be fatal. So, how much cyanide is in apple seeds?

How much cyanide is in apple seeds?

Apple seeds contain a compound called amygdalin, which breaks down into hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the presence of certain enzymes. One mg of amygdalin is equivalent to 0.6 mg of cyanide. The estimated lethal dose (LD50) of cyanide is 200-300 mg/kg body weight, so a 60 kg person would need to eat at least 12,000 apple seeds to be at risk (this is highly unlikely).

What are the risks of eating apple seeds?

Are apple seeds poisonous? There is a small amount of cyanide in apple seeds. However, it would take a large amount of apple seeds to poison someone. You would need to eat 150 – 200 apple seeds to get a lethal dose of cyanide. Apple seeds contain amygdalin, which is broken down into cyanide after eating. The body can safely process small amounts of cyanide. However, large amounts can be deadly.

There have been no reported deaths eating apple seeds However, eating a large number of them could cause vomiting and diarrhea. If you have consumed a large number of apple seeds, contact Poison Control for further instruction.

How to avoid cyanide poisoning

Although popular culture would have you believe that all apple seeds contain cyanide and are therefore poisonous, this is not the case. A single apple seed contains a very small amount of cyanide, and you would have to consume an incredibly large number of apple seeds to be at risk of cyanide poisoning. However, it is still possible to be poisoned by cyanide if you eat a large number of apple seeds or if you consume apple seeds that have been crushed or chewed.

Avoiding cyanide-containing foods

best way to avoid cyanide poisoning is by avoiding cyanide-containing foods. Some of the most common cyanide-containing foods include almonds, apple seeds, apricot kernels, cassava root, lima beans, and peach pits.

It is important to remember that even though these foods may contain cyanide, they are still safe to eat in small amounts. However, it is important to seek medical attention if you experience any symptoms of cyanide poisoning after eating any of these foods.

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